Keur Leah

 

 


Construction on our house is coming to an end. In a few short weeks, Richard and the earth team will stop the building process and begin the laborious procedure of covering the walls with layer upon layer of lyme and palm oil. The long awaited rainy season is imminent. It will give clues to it’s arrival, they tell us, with thicker air, softer skin, fewer micro-dust tunnels whirling down the open corridors, and skies that will fade from blue to a full spectrum of grey. It will tease those who have planted their crops, anxious for the first drops to inaugurate the growing and feeding cycle. The abundance of produce will help relieve the absence of money from tourists. One day someone will say “today, it will rain,” and inevitably, it will. We will be gone by then and so our job is to protect what we have built so that, when we return, we can continue. The growth will resume.

Now that the mounds of dirt and wells of mud have reunited to form their walls as Richard intended, I can see a real house, imagine walking from room to room, living a life there. Before we leave, this house, which started as an idea and now has a presence, needs a name. There are no street names or numbers to identify homes here in Senegal. The wealthy French give their large beach-front villas monikers like “Eucalyptus Shores”, and their friends successfully pick their way along the sandy lanes until they see the large, bold letters on the surrounding walls outside the security gate. The locals simply identify their homes by their family name. “Keur” in Wolof means both “heart” and “home”, so a typical Senegalese house might have a small sign outside the front door which says “Keur Diop” or the heart and home of the Diop family. We first started thinking of names for the house when it was still Richard’s dream drawn up on paper, before we ever set foot in Senegal. But the hard lines of a computer rendered plan couldn’t possibly have hinted at the soul of this house, couldn’t have told me how I would feel standing in it’s rooms, envisioning it’s future.

When we first decided to come to Senegal, I remember calling my friend Leah to tell her. Senegal was a place that was important to Leah. Her love of Africa was immense and she wanted to discover as much of it as possible. Among her many accomplishments, she had served as Director of Development for Asheshi University Foundation in Ghana. She had done substantial fundraising from their offices in Seattle and had visited the University in Ghana as a strategic consultant. We had long, in-depth phone calls during which she reiterated her desire to be a political ambassador to Africa one day, a role I feel would have fit her perfectly. Ciss, her boyfriend of many years, was a native of Senegal (a lovely fact that has never been lost on me) and together, we concocted dreams of long visits split between his family and our house, converging the coincidences of her world. She was the most diplomatic person I have ever known. She was optimistic, pragmatic and yet a dreamer in the most extraordinary ways. That’s why I knew she would be a champion of our project. In addition to her desire to experience Senegal, Leah was very sensitive to the environment. Her dream was to one day build an eco-house with a small footprint, a house that was a responsible reflection of who she was–solar panels, geo-thermal heating, a green roof planted with water filtering species. A house of her own that was comfortable and beautiful on the inside, discreet and unpretentious on the outside. Much like Leah herself.

“That is just soooo cool,” she said when I told her on the phone. I could feel her smile. “An earth house, I’m just so impressed. When can I come? No, first I want to hear all about it.” I knew she meant it. She was the person who taught me how to listen–patiently, lovingly listen. She interrupted me only when she couldn’t contain herself and needed to know something in further detail. “Now wait. So explain how the bricks are made.” After an hour, I hung up feeling like we had made the best decision of our lives, her support and enthusiasm lifting me up to a place where all my nagging doubts lay in a puddle in the past. I could only envision our future as Leah saw it–and it no longer felt scary. She had brought sense to it, extracted it’s virtues and grandness and held them up for me to see.

This was perhaps Leah’s greatest attribute–her ability to break down what felt like huge barriers to our dreams and successes. How many people did she help realize their potential? I hope to find out one day. She made her living as a life and business coach, but those of us who were fortunate enough to know her as a true friend, or sister, or daughter, know that she served as a catalyst for great change in our lives at least once. Helping me put aside my fears about this adventure in Africa and promising it’s success was her last great gift to me. She passed away, suddenly and unexpectedly, on January 9th, three weeks after I arrived in Senegal.

There are days now, very few, when I don’t think of her. That’s what time and our ability to heal will do. Then there are those moments in the void, when I realize she will never come to Senegal, that I will never see her again, and I feel cheated, for me and for her. But mostly, I sense her spirit near, in the way I look at things differently since her death. I think less about what I have lost and more about what she gave me in the 25 years I knew and loved her. All those collective memories, conversations, shared experiences, inspirations that make up a friendship are like a pleasant aura that stays with me. All I have to do is turn to it and she is there, reassuring me once again that it will all be ok, that ideas and dreams are meant to be lived. I feel her spirit every time I sit down to write and the words just won’t come. “Well, you can’t just give up,” I hear her say. And so I don’t.

And neither does Richard when the work gets hard and the days get long. It all seems so obvious now in a way it couldn’t have before we lost Leah. Our house here, with it’s simplicity and bare beauty, it’s openness to possibility, feels to me like the essence of Leah, like I could turn the corner and she would be there, admiring the openings toward the sky. It is our sanctuary, her sanctuary in Africa. In her honor, and with the promise that its walls will echo with her laughter and its doors will welcome with her arms, our house will be called “Keur Leah”–Leah’s heart, Leah’s home. It was built from the earth, and one day, many years from now, when it is no longer inhabited, it will be broken down to it’s basic components, back to the earth. I think Leah would have liked that idea.

“When you awaken in the morning’s hush
I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry;
I am not there. I did not die.”
~Mary Elizabeth Frye

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One thought on “Keur Leah

  1. Hi Ellen,I can’t begin to tell you how profoundly comforting your words encompass me. Thank you for sharing your love of Leah with the earth. Angela (sis in law)

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